Abstract

The effects of a 16-wk strength-training program on total and regional body composition were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and hydrodensitometry in 13 untrained healthy men [60 +/- 4 (SD) yr]. Nine additional men (62 +/- 6 yr) served as inactive controls. The strength-training program resulted in substantial increases in both upper (39 +/- 8%; P < 0.001) and lower (42 +/- 14%; P < 0.001) body strength. Total fat-free mass (FFM) increased by 2 kg (62.0 +/- 7.1 to 64.0 +/- 7.2 kg; P < 0.001), and total fat mass decreased by the same amount (23.8 +/- 6.7 to 21.8 +/- 6.0 kg; P < 0.001) when measured by DEXA. When measured by hydrodensitometry, similar increases in FFM (61.3 +/- 7.8 to 63.0 +/- 7.6 kg; P < 0.01) and decreases in fat mass (23.8 +/- 7.9 to 22.1 +/- 7.7 kg; P < 0.001) were observed. When measured by DEXA, FFM was increased in the arms (6.045 +/- 0.860 to 6.418 +/- 0.803 kg; P < 0.01), legs (19.416 +/- 2.228 to 20.131 +/- 2.303 kg; P < 0.001), and trunk (29.229 +/- 4.108 to 30.134 +/- 4.184 kg; P < 0.01), whereas fat mass was reduced in the arms (2.383 +/- 0.830 to 2.128 +/- 0.714 kg; P < 0.01), legs (7.583 +/- 1.675 to 6.945 +/- 1.551 kg; P < 0.001), and trunk (12.216 +/- 4.143 to 11.281 +/- 3.653 kg; P < 0.01) as a result of training.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)